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The Northern Ireland Family Resources Survey Urban Rural Report 2010/11 is published

A report entitled "Family Resources Survey Urban Rural, Northern Ireland, 2010/11" containing statistics for the period April 2010 to the end of March 2011 was published by the Department for Social Development today.
Thursday, 25 July 2013

Some of its key findings include:

Household characteristics

  • In 2010/11 the average number of persons per household in Northern Ireland was 2.5 persons, with households containing four or more persons most commonly found in the Rural area.
  • In 2010/11 the Urban West reported the highest percentage of households containing one or more unemployed adults under pension age, at 12%, compared to 3% in the Rural East, which represents the lowest percentage.
  • The highest proportion of single parent households was found in the Urban West (8%), whereas the lowest proportion was found in the Rural East (4%).

Household Income and State Support Receipt

  • In 2010/11, across Northern Ireland, 59% of total weekly household income came from wages and salaries, with a further 11% coming from self-employment income.
  • Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area and the Rural East derived the highest proportion of income from wages and salaries, at 63%.
  • Rural regions had the highest proportion of income coming from self-employment, with the Rural West region having the highest percentage (16%).
  • The Urban West reported the highest percentage of households receiving any income related benefit, at 42%, compared to 20% in the Rural East, which represents the lowest percentage.
  • The Rural West that had the highest percentage of households receiving any non-income related benefit, at 79%, whereas Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area had the lowest percentage, at 67%.

Tenure and Housing Costs

  • In 2010/11 the two Rural regions reported the highest level of accommodation owned outright; 50% of households in the Rural West and 47% of households in the Rural East.
  • The Urban West had the highest percentage of households in rented accommodation, with 24% of households renting from the social rented sector and 23% of households renting from the private rented sector.
  • Across Northern Ireland approximately 80% of households paid less than £80 per week on housing costs. The Rural area reported the highest proportion of households paying less than £80 per week, at 88%, whereas Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area reported the lowest proportion, at 73%.

Savings and Investments

  • In 2010/11 the percentage of households holding a direct payment account (including Post Office Card Accounts) was 94% across all urban rural areas, which is approximately a 10 percentage point increase on 2002/03.
  • The percentage of households with no savings and investments in the Urban area has increased by 10 percentage points between 2008/09 and 2010/11, from 50% to 60%.
  • The Urban West region had the highest percentage of households with no savings, at 64%.
  • The Rural East had the lowest percentage of households with no savings (44%) and also had the highest percentage of households with savings and investments of £20,000 or more (13%).

Occupation and Employment

  • In both Rural regions over one fifth of males were self-employed, either full-time or part-time. This compares to a Northern Ireland self-employed average of 13% for males.
  • The Rural East had the highest percentage of males (70%) and females (58%) in employment.
  • The Urban West reported the highest percentage of unemployed males and females, 11% and 5% respectively.

Deprivation

  • The Urban West region had the highest percentage of households that could not afford material deprivation indicator items; it was the highest across all twelve deprivation indicators.
  • The Rural East had the lowest percentage of households experiencing material deprivation over the majority of the material deprivation indicators.
  • The two deprivation indicators that all regions showed high levels of material deprivation on were ‘holiday away from home one week a year not staying with relatives’ and ‘make savings of £10 per month or more’.
  • Nearly half of households in the Urban West could not afford to have a holiday away from home one week a year not staying with relatives (47%), compared to the Northern Ireland average of 31%. A similar proportion of households in the Urban West could not afford to make savings of £10 per month or more (46%), compared to the Northern Ireland average of 32%.

Income Before and After Housing Costs

  • In 2010/11 the Northern Ireland median equivalised income was £379 before housing costs and £338 after housing costs. A threefold urban rural analysis showed that Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area had the highest level of income on both these measures; £385 before housing costs and £349 after housing costs.
  • Since 2002/03, the start of the time series, the Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area consistently reported higher levels of equivalised income (before housing costs), when compared to the Urban area and Rural area.
  • In 2010/11 it was found that 20% of individuals in Northern Ireland were in relative poverty (before housing costs). The Rural West reported the highest percentage of individuals in relative poverty (before housing costs), at 24%, compared to 18% in the Urban West and Rural East.
  • Across Northern Ireland 20% of individuals were found to be in relative poverty on the after housing costs measure. The Urban East region had the highest percentage of individuals in relative poverty (after housing costs), at 22% and the Rural East had the lowest percentage, at 18%.

Notes to editors:

  1. The statistics contained in the publication are based on The Family Resources Survey (FRS). This survey collects detailed data on income levels, resources and financial circumstances of individuals and households for the period from April 2010 to the end of March 2011. The FRS has been carried out in Great Britain since 1992, but 2002-03 saw the introduction of Northern Ireland for the first time.
  2. Households interviewed in the survey are asked a wide range of questions about their circumstances. Although some of the information collected is available elsewhere, the FRS provides new or much more detailed information in a number of areas and brings some topics together on one survey.
  3. Although the FRS is specifically of interest to DSD, other government departments and outside researchers will benefit from the availability of such a data source. The database can be accessed through the UK Data Archive
  4. Previous Family Resources Survey related reports for the UK are available on from DWP website and for Northern Ireland at the DSD website
  5. The Urban Rural classification used was that published by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on 10th February 2005.
  6. Further enquiries should be addressed to: Analytical Services Unit, Department for Social Development, Level Four, James House, 2 Cromac Avenue, Gasworks Business Park, Ormeau Road, Belfast, BT7 2JA; Telephone - (028) 9081 9907; E-mail Jonathan.Kane@dsdni.gov.uk
  7. For further information, contact the DSD Information Office on 028 9082 9494. Out of office hours please contact the Duty Press Officer via pager number 07699 715 440 and your call will be returned.